Vogue Pattern Book – October – November 1935 (PART 2)

Vogue Pattern Book - Oct - Nov 1935

Last month I showed you a selection of pages from the Vogue Pattern Book – October – November 1935 from my personal collection and, at the time, I did promise you more. So, here they are! What I will say, is these 20 pages are by no means everything in this book, but rather just my favourites. All of the images below can be clicked on to see a larger version, so you can have a read of all of the wonderful text.

This selection is a mixture of evening wear and separates (my favourites!), with a few ensembles to finish off at the end. I’ve also included a two-page spread that, as a vintage seamstress, I find very interesting. It goes through the process of making one of Vogue’s Easy-To-Make patterns, in a step-by-step storyboard and you can clearly see all of the authentic 1930s finishes at each stage. I try to follow these methods as much as possible in my own sewing, so it’s really lovely to see them all put together like this.

Anyway, I hope you enjoy this second helping of the Vogue Pattern Book from Oct – Nov 1935. I also have one from Oct-Nov 1938, which I will feature on here at some point. It’s great to see the difference in style over just three years and you can really see the classic 1940s looks creeping in. I’ve also just picked up a Butterick Sewing Pattern book from the Summer of 1938, which is quite spectacular. It’s got a lot more full colour illustrations in it than these Vogue books and you can really see the difference in style. Vogue seemed to be for the more elegant, demure and chic lady, whereas Butterick was more for the everyday one.

Vogue Pattern Book - Oct - Nov 1935

Vogue Pattern Book - Oct - Nov 1935

Vogue Pattern Book - Oct - Nov 1935

Vogue Pattern Book - Oct - Nov 1935

Vogue Pattern Book - Oct - Nov 1935

Vogue Pattern Book - Oct - Nov 1935

Vogue Pattern Book - Oct - Nov 1935

Vogue Pattern Book - Oct - Nov 1935

Vogue Pattern Book - Oct - Nov 1935

Cate

Just a vintage gal suffering from the Golden Age syndrome. A lover of all things old, especially the 1930s, seamstress, crocheter, maker of hats and enjoys rummaging at flea markets.

14 Comments

  1. I can’t tell you how thrilled I am to see the dolman (?) sleeves on the dinner/hostess gown page. I want to make a 30’s influenced outfit to wear to a concert and had the idea of mashing up an 80s top pattern with similar sleeves with a 90s skirt that I would re-shape. I may be biting off more than my skills will allow but the idea won’t leave me alone. Thanks for sharing the catalogue

    • Oh that’s fantastic! I hope it all goes well and you’ll have to show me the finished results. xx

  2. Gorgeous!! And also, my goodness, I want to make everything from that 1938 Butterick Sewing Pattern Book! Thank you so much for sharing these with us! <3

    • Yes, me too! It’s such perfect inspiration for my holiday wardrobe that I’m desperate to get started on. xx

  3. Another wonderful selection of drool-worthy vintage fashion images. Any of those blouses would work well in my wardrobe, they have such a timeless elegance! xxx

    • They’re great, aren’t they? Blouses from this era (and then the 70s styles that were inspired by them) are just so elegant and easy to wear. I want them all! xx

  4. Thanks for sharing this! I loved looking at all the interesting sleeve details. I also learned something new since I did not know what a “tissue fitting” was (I’ve since done some research on the internet). I imagine there are still situations where a fabric mock up would be best but this technique could occassionally save me from having to go to all that trouble!

    • Oh, you’re welcome as always! I use the tissue fitting technique on the more simple things, particularly skirts, but nothing quite beats a proper mock up first. I’d never do it on an original 1930s pattern, mind you! xx

  5. Wonderful! Thank you for sharing. I am feeling drawn to that shade of green in the illustrations, and I love the sewing tips spread. So much inspiration in these xx

    • The green shade is gorgeous, isn’t it? I just don’t have enough green in my wardrobe. It’s a colour that really suits me, so I have no idea why! xx

    • They really are, aren’t they? Vogue at this time definitely seemed to be the leader in elegance and luxury. The Butterick one is so different in feel to this, it’s much more for the every day. xx

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